The Naiad Voyages

Mark Austen

2017.04.15 - Easter Weekend - Day 2

The first task of the day was the completion of the epoxy lined pivot bolt hole in the mast.


The bolt has been removed from the cured epoxy. Since it was coated in a thin layer of grease as a release agent it was not too difficult to get it out.


The foot of the mast was cleaned up using a sander and you can clearly see the epoxy lining in the bolt hole. Just about dead centre on this side...


...but a little off-centre this side.


The discrepancy does not matter, there is epoxy all the way around the bolt even if it is a little off-centre and the tabernacle still fits as you can see.


So, that is the pivot for the mast and tabernacle done.


Before continuing on with the task list I took the photos that I did not last night due to the rain. The bowsprit in position.


The view from a different angle so that you can see that the bowsprit is not too long. The perspective in the first photo makes it look longer than it is.

I have not decided yet as to whether or not to shorten the bowsprit in front of the cranse iron.

Time for a tea-break and to get the next load of washing in the machine.

The next task I carried out was the fitting of the hawse pipe.


A correctly sized hole was drilled through the foredeck in the correct place and the pipe checked for fit.


It was a brand new hole cutter so it cut a very neat hole.


The chain locker was also dry fitted.


Mind you, I did have to cut part of the locker away in order to get it in.


The next task was the sampson post. It was cut to length, the edges rounded and the cross piece fixed. The result is shown in the above photo.


However, the sampson post did not stay on the boat for long as it moved to the point shop for the first coat of varnish.


Moving rapidly onwards, the mast and tabernacle were put onto the boat. I borrowed Tina's help to get it on and then off again a bit later on.


And I may have a design problem. I cannot tell from here but it might not be possible to lower the mast if the fore hatch is closed!!!


The holes for the bolts were drilled and the tabernacle dry fitted.

The various pieces were then put back in the workshop and the new holes all coated with neat epoxy to protect the edges of the wood from moisture. The new edge of the chain locker was also treated in this way.

Whilst the mast and tabernacle were in place I measured the distance from the stem to the front of the mast as 66". On the various photos I have of Shoal Waters, this distance is pretty much a third of the length on deck. I'm very pleased to find that 66" is exactly a third of 186" which is Naiad's length on deck. I must be doing something correctly!

Time for a lunch break.


The tasks for the afternoon were the fitting of the cranse iron and the two mast bands.


Firstly, the cranse iron was drilled with four holes for screws.


The corresponding pilot holes in the bowsprit were drilled and the extent of the cranse iron marked. Neat epoxy was put on to the bowsprit between the two marks.


The thickened epoxy was smeared on the bowsprit and the cranse iron located and screwed into position using the epoxy as a bedding compound. The will be cleaned up once the epoxy has cured.


The mast was then sanded so that the mast band fitted at the correct position up the mast.


An awkward fit as the mast band was not quite round and nor was the mast.


The same was done for the upper mast band only this time I used a rasp and then sandpaper as the mast band is too close to the top of the mast to be able to use the sanding belt.


The mast band dry fitted. I marked the aft most ring on both bands and also marked the base of the mast on the aft most face so that I can line things up correctly.


The same procedure was then followed for the mast bands as for the cranse iron. Drilling, wetting out the mast, smearing the thickened epoxy and then locating the mast bands. Screws were not put in at this time as the shortest no.8 screws I have are too long. The screws will be filled once I receive them.


As with the cranse iron, the excess epoxy will be removed once it has cured.

That's enough for the day, more will be done when the epoxy is all cured.